Gear | A Backpack for All Weather…

Outdoor Products recently asked me to take a look at their weatherproof backpack, the 30 L Shasta Weather Defense Backpack. They were kind enough to send me one of the packs so I could put it through it’s paces on the trail, on the water and in the crazy Arizona monsoons to see just how weatherproof this backpack really is.

The 30L Shasta Weather Defense Backpack

Arizona summers are oppressively hot and miserable with scorching temperatures reaching above 115 degrees in the lower desert. Most of the summer we avoid the heat and head for water or cooler temperatures. Instead of hiking and climbing as we do the rest of the year, my wife and I usually get an early start and head out to the lake for some kayaking and paddleboarding. On the weekends, we’ll head up north and hike in the shade of the pine forests or along canyon creeks. High country or low country, summer is also storm season and I have yet to have a single trip up north that didn’t rain on me at some point. What’s the common thread here? Wet. Kayaking, paddleboarding, creek hiking and rain storms all end up making it a challenge to keep our stuff dry.

Enter the Outdoor Products Shasta Weather Defense Backpack.

weather resistant backpack

I have a couple of dry bags from my whitewater days, and I’ve picked up a waterproof duffel for my camera gear, but we really didn’t have a casual backpack to handle short day trips with a high potential for getting soaked. Admittedly, the Shasta, at 30L, is a bit big for day trips. The Outdoor Products 20L version, the Amphibian, would be much more appropriate. The Shasta is deceptively huge and can carry a ton of stuff. For a beach day or paddleboarding morning it might be great with extra clothes, beach towels, snacks, etc. all stuffed in it’s generous roll-top main compartment.

The Shasta also has a convenient and sizeable front zippered pocket for quick-access items like a phone, map or sunscreen. The zipper is a nice weatherproof zipper that performed well keeping most moisture from contents inside the pocket.

The bungee cordage on either side, meant for carrying trekking poles, is handy for quickly strapping other items to the pack as well. We found it convenient to tie down wet shoes that we definitely did NOT want inside the backpack with our dry gear.

Dimensions: 20.5in x 10in x 10in / 1,654 cu in

  • Made from 420 Denier fabric with TPU coating
  • Welded seams
  • Watertight, roll top seal
  • Reflective accents
  • Articulated padded shoulder straps with sternum handle
  • Top carry handle
  • Front access pocket
  • Trekking pole holder
  • Padded waist belt

The Test Conditions

Poor Merelyn get’s all the glamorous model work when we have something like this to test out. After spending some time on the trail and on the water with the Shasta backpack she was pleasantly surprised at how comfortable it was to carry. Not loaded to capacity we didn’t really test it with a ton of weight, but with a moderate load it sat comfortably, rested well on the back and felt balanced as a backpack should. Even rock hopping in a wet and muddy creek the pack was stable, secure and kept things dry (and clean).

The backpack comes with a removable padded back support and adds some rigidity to the pack and would make heavier, bulky loads much easy to handle. It also comes with a removable waist belt. We removed them both to test out the pack, but they do offer up a bag that truly fits the backpack mold and isn’t just “another drybag”.

We spent an afternoon in the high country using the backpack for short hikes and playing along the creeks. I’ve had the backpack with me a couple of times as summer storms set in and was glad to have it. We also took it with us for our lake excursions where it stowed in the kayak, on the deck of the paddleboard and on Merelyn’s back as she paddled. We wanted to push the limits of the bag’s intended function to see how far it’s water resistance would go.

weather resistant backpack

weather resistant backpack in creek hike

testing weather resistant backpack on paddleboard

The Good, the Bad and the Wet…

The 30L Shasta Weather Defense Backpack is a really nice hybrid of a classic roll-top dry bag and a multi-use backpack. It has all the features one expects from both with little compromise. It’s roomy, comfortable and (when used properly) does a great job keeping the weather out. The TPU coated 420 Denier with welded seems essentially creates a waterproof bucket and it’s well made. This bomb-proof construction means there aren’t a lot of pockets that would require extra seems and there is only one way in or out of this bag. At about $80 retail, it’s a decent deal for a backpack of this size and comparable to a lot of similar sized drybags.

Being a roll-top bag it suffers the same limitations as any roll-top dry bag: it has to be full to work. Roll-tops require compression to work properly and make a strong seal against the elements. Like all roll-top bags, if you can’t roll the top tight enough and cinch it down, the roll loosens and water slips in. Being a 30L bag, we had to stuff a lot of gear into this bag to get the roll-top to close tightly. Sometimes, for a short while at least, you can trap enough air inside the bag to achieve a tight closure but it’s not an airtight bag and eventually you loose enough air to collapse the resistance you created. This is important to remember when choosing the bag size. Not a lot of gear, consider the 20L instead.

The outside pocket was impressively resistant to water. We had it strapped to the wet deck of the paddleboard as we bounced around in choppy water for a good 2 hours or more before the pocket showed any signs of letter water in. Splashing water and light rain didn’t make it through the pocket, making it a successful and secure weather resistant feature.

The hard part here is that the product description refers to the bag as “water tight” and it’s not. Not without a full load in the pack. Anyone who has worked with roll-tops would know this but many people may not. What it IS though, is weather resistant and and nicely designed and constructed. It serves it’s purpose well and, aside from the roll-top, keeps the water out effectively. I put this pack in my backyard pool, careful not to submerge the roll-top, and it successfully keeps all water out. I’d recommend this bag for paddling, canyoneering and backpacking in rainy conditions with complete confidence.

Just don’t treat it like it’s a sealed waterproof bag and you’ll be very happy with this backpack.

 

The Making of a Teardrop Trailer…

Our announcement a couple months ago that we had decided to order a Teardrop Trailer was a long time in the making. We started looking, researching and testing teardrops a little over 3 years ago. Now that we have committed to the purchase from TC Teardrops, we have a lot of decisions to make about how we want our build to go.

We’ve had to take a close look at how we like to travel, camp and spend time outdoors together. Realistically, we could make do with the bare minimum…realistically, we could make do with no trailer at all…but going forward we know some things would make travel a little easier, offer greater options and allow us to comfortably spend more time on the road. And that, really, is the whole goal. Our decisions have been based around the kind of travel we like and what we like to do when we get there. We like to spend our time outdoors so interior options are pretty minimal and we don’t normally cook elaborate meals so the galley could be pretty straight forward. We are more concerned with being able to get it where we want to go, making sure it is secure and offering us power and storage options for our toys and gadgets (gotta keep writing and taking pictures!).

We also had to keep the bottom line in mind while sorting through the options. One of the road blocks we faced initially looking at other teardrop companies was price. We have a number in mind that we set as our ceiling and many of our decisions have been colored by this limitation.

In an effort to answer some of the questions about what we ordered and why we chose the options we did, here is the breakdown of our build order from TC Teardrops.

TC Teardrop booth - photo by Exploring Elements

Photo by Bryon Dorr – Exploring Elements

Our Teardrop Trailer Options from TC Teardrops

The Base

5x9 teardrop package

There are several base options from TC Teardrops for their trailers. They offer a 4×8, 5×8, 5×9 and 5×10 base trailer size and everything else is built off of this. So our first decision hurdle was deciding on the size of our build. We really wanted to keep the trailer as small as possible, while still being functional for the two of us, our two dogs and some of the base gear we already travel with. We knew the 4×8 was going to be too small…no question. We initially got quotes on the 5×8 figuring there was plenty of room for us and we could make do. However, once we really started looking at the specs we ran into an issue with the size of the galley in the 5×8. At 17.5″ deep it was going to be a really tight fit to get our 50 quart cooler from Canyon Coolers in the space. The galley on the 5×9 is a roomy 25″ deep and would fit our cooler with plenty of room to spare. The 5×9 also offer additional room in the cabin so I would feel like a sardine.

teardrop trailer galley

TC Teardrops 5×9 Galley interior – photo by TC Teardrops

TC Teardrops base package includes the following:

  • Custom-built Frame
  • Powder-Coated Sides in your choice of stock colors
  • 3/4″ Side Walls
  • 14″ Aluminum Wheels and Black Powder-Coated Fenders
  • Flat Front Storage Platform
  • 2″ Coupler and Wheeled Tongue Jack
  • 2200# Torsion Axle with Bearing Buddies
  • Aluminum Diamond Plated Roof
  • Hurricane Hinge and Spring Supports on Rear Hatch
  • Two tinted doors with windows and screens
  • Two tinted windows with screens
  • Recessed LED Interior Lighting
  • LED Marker and Tail Lights
  • 12V Dual Port Accessory Outlet in Cabin
  • Cabinet w/Sunbrella Fabric Doors and Velcro Closure
  • Insulated Roof with Wood Headliner
  • Galley shelving, slide-out stove shelf and LED light
  • Battery Box wired for 12V (Battery not included)
  • 2 All-Weather Passive Side Air Vents

The Options and Upgrades

Color

Surprisingly, color was the one thing we struggled with the most. It’s easy to pick a color when buying something already built and ready for purchase. Picking a custom color from such a large selection had us debating, oscillating, comparing and (sometimes) arguing. In the end, we settled on a pretty neutral gray/silver color that would allow us to make some decorative modifications later without too much trouble.

Front Storage

I wanted something up front for storage with a little more security and protection from the elements. And since we would have room for our cooler in the galley, we could upgrade to the 60″ waterproof diamond-plate lockable toolbox up front as for storage. This will house the battery and allow us to lock up a few odds and ends that otherwise might be difficult to store.

Wheels and Tires

We talked about doing a full-on off-road package on the teardrop but the more we talked about it the more it seemed unnecessary. For the most part, we wouldn’t be hauling the teardrop places our Subaru Outback couldn’t go so we were more concerned with ground clearance than “off-road” capability. The “Ground Clearance Package” offered by TC Teardrops includes a couple extra inches of clearance with an upgrade to 15″ wheels/tires and a 25 degree 2200 lb torsion axle. We also upgraded the spare to match (of course). Budget also played a roll here, if we were not worried about the total cost we might have elected for the off-road package just because. The price difference was about $1000.

They also have different fender options. My wife and I disagreed on what would visually be better but I won out for practical reasons. I wanted the squared off Jeep style fenders mainly because it creates a small “shelf” when parked and adds some utility. I also felt they’d be a little easier to wrench back into shape if we were to bump into something or someone bump into us.

Mattress

The base package does not come with a mattress, allowing you use your own or opt to save a little weight with an air mattress or sleeping pads. We decided to have them include a Verlo Queen size mattress and mattress cover that would permanently live in the teardrop trailer. A little more comfort for us and a little less hassle when packing up for a trip. It also offers a little more insulation to an exposure through the floor.

Roof Rack System

We have a roof rack on our Outback, so we almost didn’t opt for the roof rack on the trailer. But from a utility standpoint, it’s a good idea. If we set camp somewhere and take off in the Subaru, we may not want to haul kayaks, paddleboards or bikes with us everywhere. It might be more convenient to leave them strapped (and locked) onto the teardrop. Plus, any roof accessories we would want would require a roof rack and, as it turned out, we did end up adding a couple things.

Attached Awning

TC Teardrops offers the Foxwing Awning System which, when deployed, provides 270 degrees of coverage around the side of the trailer it’s mounted on. It’s quick and easy to set up and when folded in, it is surprisingly compact. Having the built in shade options, especially for trips here in the desert, saves us from lugging clunky pop-ups or rigging tarps to nearby trees.

Power and Charging

The trailers are all pre-wired for 12V power. The included LED lights run off of a 12V battery that we’ll supply when the trailer gets here. We also had them include a 15W solar panel to keep the battery charged up. We asked them if we could get a couple of USB accessory charging ports in the cabin and had them include the 110V Shore Power outlets in the galley for when we have the ability to plug in somewhere.

Interior Options

teardrop interior cabinet storage

To finish off the interior we selected their Honey Maple finish color and had them add Sunbrella fabric “cabinet doors” to the interior storage shelf. For ventilation and comfort we are having them add the zippered screen doors and a 12V directional ceiling fan to supplement whatever air we get from the included side vents and windows. Most of the other interior modifications we have in mind, we’ll do ourselves. Storage solutions and decorative decisions inside we’ll customize as we go based on use and need.

Other Options

Our teardrop will also have a 2″ receiver hitch with a 75lb limit for additional storage or rack options (if needed). We asked to include the small prep table for the galley area. We also asked about getting a custom made storage cover for the trailer since ours will end up having to spend time exposed to the elements when not in use. We are still debating getting a custom vinyl graphic done for the back lid (galley cover) but at this point I think we’re leaning away from it. Like choosing a color, trying to pick out or design a graphic for the back will likely cause more problems than it’s worth.

Putting this all together has been fun and Carol at TC Teardrops has been very patient with our order changes, revisions and questions. The closer our build date gets, the more excited we are about getting our trailer and putting it to use on the road. Time might be tight for a while, but we’re already talking about doing a cross-country trip with our new trailer next year. We can’t wait to add #TeardropAdventures to our social stream.

Have any questions about our trailer build, or the options we chose, feel free to drop us a comment. Any questions about TC Teardrops, their process or pricing go to TC Teardrops.com or email Carol.

Thanks to TC Teardrops for use of some of their photos.

Click here for an update on how things are going with the trailer now that we have been using it a while.